Registered Charity number 1065009

 

Training in Psychodynamic and Psychoanalytic Psychotherapy

Psychoanalytic psychotherapy is based upon psychoanalytic theory and practice and derives from knowledge of the unconscious processes that influence the mental life of the individual.  Psychoanalytic psychotherapy utilises this knowledge to promote psychological development and to treat and prevent mental suffering, illness and dysfunction in individuals, groups and organisations.

The North of England Association for Psychoanalytic Psychotherapy (NEAPP) offers an established training in individual psychoanalytic psychotherapy with adults.  This training was established in 1992, becoming the first training in England outside London to be accredited by the British Psychoanalytic Council (BPC).  NEAPP now has over 30 clinical members.  The British Psychological Society and the Royal College of Psychiatrists also accredit the course.

Course graduates may expect to use their professional training and qualification as the basis for both autonomous independent practice and a career in the NHS.

Since 2013 NEAPP has offered three trainings:

1.  

Training as a Psychoanalytic Psychotherapist

The original training in psychoanalytic psychotherapy.

2.  

Modified Training as a Psychoanalytic Psychotherapist

A modified form of the training in psychoanalytic psychotherapy for those who are already trained as Child and Adolescent Psychotherapists with the Association of Child Psychotherapy and who wish to extend their training to work with adults and for experienced psychoanalytic psychotherapists who are not BPC registrants but who have successfully followed an intensive training psychotherapy equivalent to that required for the NEAPP Psychoanalytic Psychotherapy training.

3.

Training as a Psychodynamic Psychotherapist

A training in psychodynamic psychotherapy based on the same psychoanalytic principles.  This new training is intended for those who wish to concentrate on working once or twice a week with patients.

All three trainings are accredited by the BPC and lead to registration with the BPC upon qualification.

Overview of the NEAPP Trainings

The three trainings interlock.  All trainees will share the theoretical seminars, and – except for those taking the modified training course – all will share the infant observation seminars.  We aim to foster a community of trainees who will work together across the courses and who will continue to work together as members of the Association after qualification.

The following is a brief outline of our three trainings:

Training as a Psychoanalytic Psychotherapist

The training takes a minimum of four years.  There are five core components to the course:

  • Personal psychoanalytic psychotherapy or psychoanalysis at a minimum frequency of three times per week with an experienced psychoanalyst or psychoanalytic psychotherapist approved by the Training Committee.  This should begin one year or more before the academic course, and continue at least until qualification for membership.
  • Theoretical seminars.
  • Clinical seminars.
  • Observation of an infant with associated seminars.
  • Supervised psychoanalytic psychotherapy treatment of three patients.

Modified Training as a Psychoanalytic Psychotherapist

The training takes a minimum of three years.  There are three components to the course:

  • Theoretical seminars.
  • Clinical seminars.
  • Supervised treatment of three patients in psychoanalytic psychotherapy.

After discussion with the trainee the Training Committee may relax the requirements for theoretical seminars to take account of study already undertaken in earlier training.

Adult psychotherapists who have not attended Infant Observation Seminars will have to complete a year's observation of a baby and write a paper on their experience.

Training as a Psychodynamic Psychotherapist

The training takes a minimum of three years.  There are five components to the course:

  • Personal psychoanalytic psychotherapy or psychoanalysis at a minimum frequency of once per week with an experienced psychoanalyst or psychoanalytic psychotherapist approved by the Training Committee.  This should begin one year or more before the academic course, and continue at least until qualification for membership.
  • Theoretical seminars.
  • Clinical seminars.
  • Observation of an infant with associated seminars.
  • Supervised treatment of two patients in psychodynamic psychotherapy.

General Information

Academic and Clinical Seminars

The theoretical seminars, which are shared by all trainees, last for three years.  They include studying the work of all major psychoanalytic thinkers and practitioners, from Freud through Klein, Fairbairn, Winnicott and Bion to the present day.  The seminars also address assessment, clinical psychopathology, research and evaluation, neuro-psychoanalysis and other topics relevant to the practice of psychoanalytic psychotherapy.  The clinical seminars begin in the second year and continue until qualification.

Infant Observation Seminars

During the first year of the course trainees are required to observe a new baby and mother in the family setting once a week for an hour.  The observations are discussed at regular seminars.

Supervised Clinical Work

During the second year of the course, the trainee will normally begin the work with training cases under weekly supervision.  Those training as psychoanalytic psychotherapists must see three patients during the training, two intensively at a frequency of three times a week (one for a minimum of two years, the other for a minimum of eighteen months) and one at a frequency of once a week for a minimum of one year.

Trainees will normally have one male and one female patient for their intensive cases and one male and one female supervisor approved by the Training Committee and chosen by the trainee.  The supervision will continue until qualification or until the satisfactory ending of treatment, whichever comes first.

The once weekly case will be supervised weekly in a group.

Those training as psychodynamic psychotherapists will see two patients at a frequency of once or twice per week (one for a minimum of eighteen months, the other for a minimum of one year) with supervision in a group by a supervisor approved by the Training Committee. Trainees will normally have one male and one female patient.

Assessment & Qualification

Trainees are continuously assessed throughout the training by means of reports from supervisors and seminar leaders.  They are required to write a paper on their infant observation in the first academic year, six-monthly reports on their training cases and a final report on their once-weekly case.

Each trainee is allocated a tutor, who usually meets with the trainee once per term and is the primary link between the training committee and the trainee.

When the trainee has satisfied all the course requirements and the Training Committee consider that he/she is ready to proceed to qualify, the Committee will give permission to write a reading-in paper.  Once this paper has been accepted by the Committee and presented successfully to a panel of the Training Committee, the process of qualification is complete.

Qualification brings clinical membership of the Association and through this membership professional registration with the British Psychoanalytic Council.  A Professional Committee elected by the clinical members of NEAPP aims to foster the continuing professional development of a high standard of psychotherapeutic practice by providing opportunities for members to meet, discuss and critically evaluate their work.

Time Commitment

The academic year starts in January and there are three twelve-week terms per year.  Seminars normally take place on Tuesdays from 17:00 to 18:15 (theoretical seminars) and 18:30 to 19:45 (clinical seminars) at Claremont House in Newcastle.  From time to time two or three Tuesday seminars may be replaced by equivalent seminars on a Saturday.  These and the infant observation seminars may take place in York or Leeds.

First year: Theoretical seminars and the infant observation and seminars.
Second year: Theoretical and clinical seminars.  Two training cases with supervision.
Third year Theoretical and clinical seminars.  Two training cases (and a third case for psychoanalytic psychotherapy trainees) with supervision.
Continuing years:     Training cases with supervision and clinical seminars.

Time will also need to be set aside for reading, writing up clinical notes and reports.

The Cost of Training

The basic course fees are currently set at £1,800 per term for the psychoanalytic psychotherapy training and £1,100 per term for the psychodynamic psychotherapy training, payable for the first 3 years (9 terms) of training.  It may be possible by arrangement with the Finance Director for self-financing trainees to spread the payment of fees over a longer period.

The fees include all seminars for three years and supervision of the training cases for the required minimum period of therapy.  After this period fees for supervision are paid directly to the supervisors for individual supervision or to NEAPP for group supervision.  The current cost of this additional supervision is in the region of £50 per session or £100 per term for group supervision.  Trainees are required to attend clinical seminars until qualification.  The fees for the seminars beyond the first three years of the course are currently £100 per term.

Fees for personal therapy are paid directly to the training therapist.  At current prices, the cost is likely to be in the region of £50 per session.

For personal therapy and additional individual supervision you should budget for around 42 weeks per year.

Fees for the modified training the basic fee of £1,800 per term will be adjusted on an individual basis.  This will depend, for example, on whether the trainee follows the infant observation seminars and on whether it is agreed that it is unnecessary to take all the theoretical seminars.

There is an application fee of £75.

Application for the Trainings

Applicants for the psychoanalytic psychotherapy and psychodynamic psychotherapy trainings should normally:

  • be already experienced in psychotherapeutic work and be at a stage in their professional development that would allow uninterrupted training for the duration of the course;
  • have a university degree or hold a recognised professional qualification and be able to demonstrate the ability to complete an intellectually demanding theoretical course;
  • have had several years of post-graduate professional practice including experience working with clients or patients with mental and psychological disturbance; and
  • have completed a one-year introductory course or its equivalent in psychoanalytically-oriented psychotherapy.

Applicants for the modified training in psychoanalytic psychotherapy should have had at least two years of clinical experience since qualification.

How to Apply

People interested in applying, whether now or in the future, are encouraged to contact us to discuss informally whether they have sufficient experience and, if not, how it might be gained.  Enquiries should be addressed to the Course Director.

Post-Qualification Research

NEAPP has combined with Northumbria University to provide a Professional Doctorate in Psychoanalytic Psychotherapy.

The Professional Doctorate in Psychoanalytic Psychotherapy, offered by the Northumbria University, is in two parts – a clinical training component and a research component.  It is open to Psychoanalysts and Psychoanalytic Psychotherapists accredited by the British Psychoanalytic Council and Child and Adolescent Psychotherapists accredited by the Association of Child Psychotherapists.  These trainings constitute the clinical component.  The research component offers a structured method of continuing professional development aimed at furthering research skills and contributing to the development of the field.  The combination of these two parts leads to a Doctorate in Psychoanalytic Psychotherapy.

Research in the context of a professional doctorate should be of relevance to clinical practice and should in some form contribute to the field of clinical work.  The programme comprises a taught course in research methodology and a research thesis.  The length of the thesis will be a maximum of 60,000 words.

The course is part-time over three years and the current fees are £2,050 per annum.

To discuss an application contact:

  • Dr. Michael Hill
  • Professor Ken Robinson